Spy Shots Reveal Electric Range Rover Concepts with Dramatically Reduced Roof Height

Is the Electric SUV a Future Possibility for Land Rover?

The initial models of an electric Range Rover were recently observed in the Arctic Circle. However, contrary to our expectations of a conventional Range Rover as the company’s inaugural EV, these test vehicles feature a notably lowered roofline. This is due to the fact that the SUV in view is not the official Range Rover Electric, but rather a successor to the Range Rover Velar.

As the electric prototype briefly caught our attention, a Defender quickly intervened and concealed it from sight. However, it was evident that a fake roofline and rear cabin were attached to the authentic body of the electric SUV. The Defender 130 also provided insight into the size of the upcoming model, revealing a slimmer and more sophisticated design compared to the prominent Range Rover and Range Rover Sport.

As we have not received any official confirmation from Range Rover, it is difficult to obtain specific details about their latest developments. This is especially relevant as the brand has now become a separate entity from its Defender and Discovery counterparts, after undergoing reformation within JLR. Nonetheless, we do know that JLR is in the process of designing a revolutionary new electric modular architecture (EMA) that will serve as the foundation for a complete range of electric crossover vehicles. For the time being, these vehicles will be manufactured at the Halewood production plant in the UK.

Range Rover’s upcoming eSUV will be the second of its kind and will be accompanied by electric variants of Range Rover Evoque and Range Rover Sport within the JLR group. Despite its highly-anticipated debut, this specific model is expected to encounter fierce rivalry, especially from the recently released Porsche Macan Electric.

The MLA, currently utilized in the Range Rover and Range Rover Sport, will be further utilized by Jaguar, incorporating electric, hybrid, and combustion powertrain options. This particular architecture is known for its off-road capabilities, in contrast to the EMA platform, which is primarily geared towards road use in the upcoming Range Rover Velar Electric.

Additional information will be revealed in the near future as we anticipate the release of the electric Velar around 2026. Despite this, we anticipate that dual-motor powertrains will be the norm, and it is possible that there will be 600 horsepower models available as the highest-end options upon launch.

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